A Design for a Motif from Parsifal

SIMEON SOLOMON (1840-1905)
PRE-RAPHAELITE (founded 1848) Biography
SYMBOLISM (founded 1886) Biography

A Design for a Motif from Parsifal (England, 1894)

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Blue chalk on paper
Signed and inscribed with the title and dated 1894

Dimensions

45.00cm high
61.00cm wide
(17.72 inches high)
(24.02 inches wide)
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Literature

Paul Lang, Richard Wagner, Visions d'artistes, d'Auguste Renoir à Anselm Kiefer, Musée Rath Geneva, September 2005-January 2006, catalogue 37, illustrated page 153

Exhibition History

Musée Rath Geneva, Richard Wagner, Visions d'artistes, d'Auguste Renoir à Anselm Kiefer, September 2005 - January 2006, catalogue 37

Description / Expertise

The present drawing evokes the mediaeval legend of The Holy Grail. Parsifal and his son Lohengrin were entrusted as Christian knights to guard the Holy Grail, which was the vessel from which Christ drank at His Last Supper. Their tribulations and eventual victory are represented as an allegory of the triumph on Christianity over paganism. The subject of the Holy Grail was treated by various nineteenth century artists including Solomon’s old friend Edward Burne-Jones. Richard Wagner’s operas Lohengrin and Parsifal treated the theme in a completely original way and incorporated fragments of the legend from a wide variety of sources. Wagner’s Parsifal was first produced in Bayreuth in 1882, but was not heard in London until 1914.