Portrait of Effie with Foxgloves in her Hair (The Foxglove) after Sir John Everett Millais (1829-1896)

EUPHEMIA (EFFIE) CHALMERS RUSKIN (NÉE GRAY, LATER LADY MILLAIS) (1828-1897) Biography
PRE-RAPHAELITE (founded 1848) Biography

Portrait of Effie with Foxgloves in her Hair (The Foxglove) after Sir John Everett Millais (1829-1896) (England, 1853)

Not for Sale Not for Sale
Pencil on paper
Signed with monogram and dated 1853

Dimensions

25.50cm high
20.50cm wide
(10.04 inches high)
(8.07 inches wide)
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Provenance

Lent from a private collection

Literature

John Guille Millais, The Life and Letters of Sir John Everett Millais, Methuen & Co, London 1900, 2 volumes, Volume I page 219, illustrated
Peter Nahum, The Brotherhood of Ruralists and the Pre-Raphaelites, 2005, The Leicester Galleries Exhibition Catalogue, illustrated, number 29

Exhibition History

London, Peter Nahum at The Leicester Galleries, The Brotherhood of Ruralists and the Pre-Raphaelites, June - July 2005, number 29

Description / Expertise

In 1853 John James Ruskin, successful wine merchant and father of the celebrated art critic, offered to pay for a portrait of his son. John Ruskin selected the head of the Pre-Raphaelites, the avant-garde art movement of which he was the champion, John Everett Millais to paint his portrait. Ruskin, his new wife Effie and Millais set off for a four month stay at a small cottage in Glenfinlas in Scotland to complete the commission. There, while Millais waited for his canvas to arrive, he taught Effie to draw and fell in love with her. Ruskin, introverted and extremely eccentric, who had no idea how to interact with a female partner, if anything, unwittingly encouraged the pair. The ensuing scandal within London Society resulted in three extremely unhappy participants and the annulment of the Ruskins’ marriage. Effie and Millais were married in 1855.

Millais’ portrait of Effie, The Foxglove, from which this was copied, is in the collection of National Trust at Wightwick Manor.